Tag Archives: weight loss

Compete to better yourself vs train to be ready to compete

 

In the past few months, in between living my life, working and my weightlifting training I was also exposed to competitive weightlifting from both athlete’s perspective (competing myself) and from organisational aspect such as putting a team of athletes together to compete and hosting a competition in my home club (Battersea Weightlifting Club).snatch

This experience opened up a dialogue with fellow lifters and club’s athletes. What I’ve learnt as an athlete myself is that there are many good lifters, new lifters who don’t want to compete or represent the club for quiet a strange reason which I would refer to as misunderstanding, misconception or even missing the point.

There are many weightlifting competitions taking place throughout the year in the UK and while majority of competitions are only for registered athletes [under British Weightlifting Federation] they allowathletes of all abilities (new and professional) to compete in front of the referees on the platform and more than likely with very good and supportive audience.

I only took part in two competitions this year thus far under British Weighltifting and on behalf of my club; however competed in others such as lifting league for South-East of the UK.

First competition took place in January 2015 and it was a great experience. Out of 6 lifts I’ve hit 5 good lifts which was great and then I’ve missed two competitions due to travelling and competed again at the end of May.

Many of my fellow lifters ask me if I am ready to compete? My answer is simple: as ready as I can be!

So, why are there athletes, lifters, males and females who are scared of weightlifting and when invited to compete they decline with usual excuse: “I am not ready, I need to train more to be able to compete!”

My coach once told me that competing to get experience as a new lifter is what I should focus on. Get as many times on the platform as you can – was his view.

So I did! Once registered for the competition my competitive spirit then started to get concerned about making weight category (ie. dropping into category I would like to compete instead of just getting as many good lifts as possible). I was also getting too concerned about being the weakest lifter on the platform with very low opening attempts.

My fears were well-managed and consequently eliminated by my fellow lifter and training partner and coach. All of the worries about body weight and other lifters were irrelevant to me as a new lifter.

The moment I stepped on to the platform I hit new PBs; both in snatch and clean&jerk.

The difference between training and lifting at the competition was that I couldn’t hit those numbers in the training and struggled to get over my comfortable numbers. When I was encouraged to compete the work I’ve put into the preparation has paid off on the platform. For me it was the adrenalin, the coach, the audience and ambience which made a difference.

Why should you aim to compete and enter the competitive weightlifting at any stage?

1. Competitive weightlifting gives lifters different experience from ambience, warm up and build up to your first lift through to your best lift

2. Adrenalin levels often than not run much higher in the competitive environment over training environment which means that your PBs are likely to be hit and new PBs made

3. Learning from other lifters of similar weight, body composition which you might not normally see lifting with you or next to you in the warm up room will give you new perspective

4. Relationship with your coach changes and improves every time you prepare for competition, compete and even after competition. You will get to know your coach from different angle. You will see a different person and not just somebody who writes a programme and shouts clues at you during training.

5. Finally, entering competitive weightlifting gives those who train hard, have a strict routine a reason to celebrate and reflect on the progress made; I treat myself to a few days off from training and enjoy good food treats.

By believe that you are not good enough or ready enough to compete you are holding back from facing the referees, the platform and most importantly yourself from your true athletic and physical potential and new PBs.

Getting involved with competitive weightlifting is simple:

1. register with British Weightlifting by registering as unattached athlete or attached (by joining a club)

2. find out about your local competitions and clubs and maybe start with club competitions

3. ensure you have a good coach who understands weightlifting and supports you in competition

4. get involved!

I am a girl and I lift heavy

More references can be found here:

http://britishweightlifting.org/

https://www.facebook.com/batterseaweightlifting

 

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Weightlifting gives me just another reason to flash my body…. Or how I’ve never thought I will wear half tops confidently

Day 1 of my well deserved holidays – reporting from Bali, Indonesia.

After 22 hours of flying I made it to the party destination of Southern hemisphere. This place is known for its Aussie and Kiwi tourists as much as Magaluf is known for it’s British visitors. Aspirations for travelling to these destinations are the same – party till you drop, consume as much alcohol as you can and lose dignity as fast as possible.

Bali is a place to have a good time but it does have many beautiful hidden gems and amongst partying is known for surfing and very lovely people of Bali who make your stay a bliss if you don’t give into the temptation of partying every day and spending holidays with hangovers.

So what am I doing here? Clearly not searching for a crossfit box or a weightlifting gym or on the quest to get to eat in some paleo restaurant, you wouldn’t find them here easily I reckon. I am simply here to let my hair down and enjoy the island which I loved first time I visited in April.

On this occasion I am also meeting up with my friends – girls from Australia and New Zealand. I haven’t seen some of them for over 18 months and I missed them a lot.

First night – going big – white party in Kuta

As our plan to meet up somewhere glam progressed into attending a prestigious and almost the poshest party in Bali, I had to rush from the airport to hotel to change (glam up) and attend the party to see my dear friends.

My flight was way too long to consider spending more than 30 minutes of getting ready. Usually, I would spend twice the amount of time getting ready (still a typical girl!!!). I had to cut down the average time of getting ready as I needed to jump into a taxi before midnight. I quickly pulled my white dress from the suitcase, specifically purchased for this occasion. Meanwhile, I checked my Facebook for the details of the party location only to find out that girls are dressed amazingly hot, with surprisingly short shorts (could refer to them as underwear) and bra tops revealing all their beautiful bodies.

Looking in the mirror and my conservative knee length white dress I realised that I will be out of place at that party if going by their outfits was reflectin the attire of roughly 300 people.

A few minutes of consideration and analysing the self reflection in the mirror I decided to go for a slightly out of my comfort zone outfit.

I pulled a short white lambada skirt and matched it with the white top which I tucked in to reveal my tummy (or abs as some would refer to).

“This was not going to be worn by you!” – said the inside voice.
“You are too fat for this! You’ve never worn anything that would show your belly!!! You don’t even dare to wear a sports bra in the training session in the environment which is called “home” – gym!!”

Alright, so that was not going to be a solution. I changed back to white dress which was my kind of dress.

….

15 min later I left the hotel to flag a taxi in a white lambada skirt and top revealing my tummy!

I overcame my own disbelief in my own body and felt comfortable more than ever before.

I never knew I would wear this outfit ever!

What made me change my mind?

I credit all the workout, exercise and clean eating. I have no belly fat to complaint about and my body did look great and was worth showing it out to the world!

Weightlifting made my body what it is today – strong and proud! I didn’t care much about what anyone thinks of it, I know that it can lift a lot of weight and I know it is my body – machine – which nowadays I treat with respect and understand it better than ever before.

What happened next?

I had a great night out! I reunited with my friend and we had a blast! Lots of laugh, lots of dancing and lots of compliments.
The compliments were coming from men but also from girls, who loved dancing with us on the stage.

Those who knew us from London were complimenting how well we all looked comparing to our high party times in London when we were abusing our bodies and mistreated them.

We didn’t have to drink much to have a good time last night and recounting what happened was not at all about losing dignity as we were used to in our prime years in London.

Last night we were glowing! Happy healthy glow reflecting pride and confidence in our bodies!

I am a girl and I am proud to lift heavy x

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“All in One” long term measuring of your weightlifting performance, body weight, clothes size and major lifts… conclusions which will shock most weightloss theories

Past few days I spent collating information and data jotted down in various diaries and notepads I had started and never finished since October 2012 and searching for email conversations with my coaches related to my progress and data.

Putting together a table and chart which covers a lot of (at times) random information was a big ask on myself, but I have finally finished it and my own findings and statements below are the result of a long-term (22 months) data and information recorded in a simple excel format.

The graph 1 which I produced from this data is somewhat less easy to read so I decided to break it down to main comparables in a series of graph for example “body weight” vs “clothes size” to prove that the myth of” weight loss diets mean smaller clothes” is just a myth!

What was I recording:

Body Weight / dress size / front squat / back squat / dead lift/ snatch (lift) / clean and jerk (lift) / injuries

main chart

A few conclusions from my initial graph are as follows:

* The most body weight (in kg) I’ve lost in the measured period of 22 months was staggering 17kg!!!

* My average body weight in those 22 months was 62.18 kg

* The longest injury free period was 4 months at the very beginning of the measured period where I weight 70kg and lifted a very small % of my body weight. Another 4 months of injury free period was early this year Feb – May 2014, the time I was hitting heavier weights and started crossfit (April 2014)

* I had over two months off from training due to my broken foot which is the injury incurred during Tough Mudder 2013

* My lifts started to improve this year significantly after joining crossfit box in London and I also dedicated a lot of time to weightlifting and became coached by Rich Kite

* My body weight is creeping up slightly, however my dress size dropped to UK 6 even though I am 5 kg heavier than my lightest 54kg when I was size UK8

 

Graph2: Body Weight vs Clothes size

When I was at my heaviest 71 kg my dress size was UK14. This was not due to my whole body being fat, but predominantly my body shape being “pear shape” which meant my hips were very wide and I carried a lot of fat on my hips, tummy and on my back.

After 18 months I was weighing 54kg but my dress size was UK8. Today I weigh 58-59kg and my dress size is UK6. Muscles weigh more than fat!

graph 1

Graph 3: Clean and Jerk and Front Squat have direct correlation

The below indicates a few key points for my training. Front squats are important in your clean and jerk olympic lift. There is a direct correlation between the weight squatted and the weight cleaned. No wonder that part of my weightlifting training session is front squat.

Muscle memory: You can see that I had no lifts recorded last summer (2013). It is because I was injured and couldn’t lift or train. Though muscle memory remained pretty strong and my return to lifting was pretty strong too. More on muscle memory can be read here: http://www.dna-sports-performance.com/coaches-zone/muscle-memory-a-coaches-perspective/

c&J and front squat

As I dig deeper into my analysis of my figures I will be publishing more articles on my form and performance over 22 months period.

I am a girl and I lift heavy x

Emotional roller coaster of crossfit and weight loss

Past few days were very emotional for me. The ups and downs of building career in the financial world while devoting all of my free time to weightlifting, crossfit and weight loss have just started to show their true colours. It’s not easy and I almost want to give up.

The most frustrating of the past few days was making a decision not to compete at the European Inferno in Cardiff. My first ever competition in Crossfit and I had to pull out of it 2 weeks before it’s taking place due to my wrist injury.

hand

How did I arrive to this decision?

Through tears, through number of conversations with my training partner and team buddy for the said competition, through lots of resistance from my side, through a few physio sessions and hard training sessions checking my current abilities and most importantly through a lot of physical pain in my wrist.

Why did I decide to pull out?

It was probably the most sensible decision made in the past few years. I am not a person who enjoys sitting on the side lines and assuming a spectator spot especially if I trained hard to compete in the competition I will end up attending as a supporter and not athlete. The excitement of competing drove my training and influenced my programming, so this was not the easiest of decisions to make.

It was a moment of sanity influenced by professional fellow athletes who like me, once were injured (if not more than once) and knew that I am not fit to compete and would only injure myself more in the process and that would cause a long-term injury with inability to train AT ALL for at least 6 months.

Benefits of that sober moment when you DO THE RIGHT THING despite this being the MOST PAINFUL decision:

1. Avoiding further damage to my wrist and potentially preventing more injuries

2. Allowing current injury to heal properly

3. Refocusing for another competition (October 2014 – Inov8 Trials in Manchester) with my training and programming

4. Learning to listen to my body’s signals

5. Becoming a spectator at the fantastic event which will allow me to breathe in even more motivation for my future competitions

As my emotions were running high and consumption of sugars on a day of making a decision was significantly higher than usual, the positives of all bad situations appeared on the horizon and I decided to look up, wipe my tears and follow the ray of light shining from the end of the tunnel.

The good news which arrived included my first ever photo shoot for Women’s Health magazine and a good training session in crossfit with mastering of my 1st strict pull up ever!

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Onwards and upwards with setbacks being new comebacks.

I am a girl and I lift heavy

Crossfit Games – late night watching and snacking

So the time has come. The Crossfit Games 2014 are upon us! Sadly due to time difference those unfortunate who did not obtain tickets to watch it LIVE will have to put up with a live stream on their computers or ESPN.  The stream starts 5pm GMT and ends around 3am in the morning.

Those who can stay up will have to be glued on their screens till early hours. So, what are the benefits of watching amazing athletes  and the fittest on earth?

They are inspirational! I wouldn’t want to miss Rich Fronning, Annie Thorisdottir, Denae Brown and inspirational Elisabeth Akinwale and many more amazing athletes.

They are strong!

They go beyond what many crossfit athletes dream of and aspire to!

Besides all the athletes, the WODs are something to look at and learn from whether you are the athlete or a coach. This year’s WODs are not a surprise but a combination of long distance running and swimming with our good old classics which can’t be missed in any Crossfit WOD – burpees and thrusters!

nut butter

But, what are you going to do with your own training routine during next 4-5 days? Are you going to stick to your morning training after spending a night glued on the screen being envious and excited to watch the impossible becoming possible?

Are you going to give into late night snacking? What will you snack on?

There are ways to combine your own routine with this exceptional TV coverage.

1. move your trainings to more suitable times (i.e. evenings if you are going to stay up late)

2. visit the website games.crossfit.com for schedules and WODs and select those that you will definitely want to watch

3. go to sleep if you are having a long day ahead – there is ARCHIVE which you can watch online after the events

4. Don’t snack too late and if you really can’t stop or hold yourself have something light or sip on a cup of green tea! Personally, I will have nearly empty jar of cashew nut butter hidden for the worst cravings.

5. Don’t forget to drink lots of water

Enjoy the Games and keep lifting!

 

I am a girl and I lift heavy x

Managing work life and healthy lifestyle – mastering being Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

This is one of my first posts and somewhat a very broad topic on my blog. It is my first post, so bear with me. To start a blog was suggested to me last night by one of my coaches (I dare to call him my coach, even though it is very early days since he started to give me input into my training). He convinced me that I should record and share my experience with achieving my fitness goals through leading healthy life style while working in a full-time job and still living a busy Londoner’s social life (even though that is a topic on its own). So, I took his suggestion on board and started TODAY.

I often get approached on the topic of weight loss (in my dictionary fat loss) by my female colleagues who as much as I, work long hours 8am till 6pm and commute to their workplace over 30 minutes each morning and evening. Our jobs are stressful. We are working for a young, dynamic financial company (FX brokerage) with 3+ year super plans for growth which requires our 110% committment not only during working hours but also after and before.
So, they ask, how do I manage to work on my personal fitness goals while I have to perform in my job and continuing to build my career in financial world as a young female ? Where do you find the time and energy to do everything?
I’ve noticed in past years that this is not only my few female colleagues  who question this but many other friends and anonymous posts on social media.

I don’t think that these girls lack motivation; and I would be too harsh if I said that girls who want to be fit, strong and healthy often don’t have motivation or real drive. In today’s information overload there are plenty of motivational images, messages and marketing out there in the ether that will help you get your bum off the sofa and do something about your health and aesthetics.
The problem is that many girls often start encouraged, self-motivated and with the right intention but give up after 7 days! They don’t even make it to-day 5 in some cases. This has nothing to do with lack of motivation but actually a lot to do with not knowing HOW TO manage busy life style and prioritse the correct activities. Believe me, the fitness models on the websites and Facebook which are used by media to motivate us to do something about our bodies and our health are not full-time employed girls in the office or shops or even restaurants. Often enough they are sponsored athletes and can train more than once a day! Training in the gym is their job!

On the other hand…
Office girls (like me), as I refer to many girls I see on the tube or buses with their gym bags and hand bags, in suits and trainers often start their week with a resolution to go to the gym at least 3 times in that given week, but they often end up going once or not at all.

In my view we fail after a few days because we are not taught how to manage change in our lives. Even in business when there is a major change we appoint an interim change manager – a person that is solely responsible to manage unexpected reactions to scheduled changes within business.

How to manage early days changes in your lifestyle and go beyond 7 days of healthy life style and exercise:

Here I am assuming that you’ve decided on your goals and you are motivated to work on your these fitness goals.  Below is a simple guide on how to stick to your plan in early days and not give up in early days:

  • Establish whether you are exercising in the morning or evening or you are mixing it up (as I often do due to my work commitments)
  • Plan your week at least 7-9 days in advance (i.e I know on Friday what I will be doing for next 7 days and I stick to my plans and schedules – don’t beat yourself up if you have to cancel or change, but treat cancellations and changes to your plan as an exempt to the rule)
  • Ensure that your work diary contains your evening  or early morning commitments (I book my crossfit and weightlifting sessions up to 9 days in advance and I always put these into my work diary, so no one books me into late meetings)
  • Pre-pack your gym bag and prepare your work clothes the night before – a good way to commit to taking a gym bag to work with you and go to the gym after work
  • Learn to say “no” to tempting social activities if they are not happening on your rest day or suggest that you will join the crowd later on. I used to have a huge “Fear Of Missing Out”, but I’ve managed to overcome it by seeing the results of my training and improvement in my performance. One drunken night can be missed if I can lift 5 kg more by not attending one of many drinking sessions.
  • Learn to synchronise your friends and social life with your training commitments. This is the hardest bit and many fail, but we already know how to synchronise work and social life, so why not gym and social life? I train on Saturday morning, allowing myself to spend Saturday afternoon and evening with friends. I often go for nice dinners or host girls’ nights in on Friday so that I am not too tired for an early morning training session, but still manage to socialise.
  • Keep a diary and record your sessions and performances. Every time you open it and see it, it will be a reminder of what you achieved and what you could be achieving in the future.
  • Financial committment i.e. paid for PT sessions are always a good way to get yourself out there, but make sure it is the right session for you. No point in paying somebody for mediocre session which doesn’t suit your goal. Crossfit gyms might seem expensive at first, but you are being coached in a class with attention of a professional, so they actually work out to be cheaper than gym + PT (which I used to spend a lot of money on).tumblr_m4qthg5uiM1rnpszno1_500

GYM and 2hrs of PT per week cost in Central London: avg per month £49 + £240 = £289

Crossfit in SW London: 5 sessions per week plus free gym session: cca £160 per month

Gym only fees (but will you attend at least 4 times a week??) in London from as low as £19 per month

  • Nutrition and food intake need to match your goals. Are you looking to run faster, get stronger, lift more or lose fat in certain areas? Food is the most important part of your journey. Starving is not allowed! You must eat healthy food. I am not a nutritionist but I can give feedback on some changes I’ve made in recent years to my nutrition. Some worked better than others, but I don’t eat any wheat or gluten. I am controlling everything I eat and I plan my foods at least a day in advance. Personally, this always has been an area where I failed and was challenged by. But, I never gave up!

I am currently completing my first WHOLE30 programme which has brought results I strived for. I am on my 24th day as I write this and I feel pretty good. (if you are interested in trying it out then I suggest you also get a book “It all starts with Food” to find out why clean eating is important)

When you can’t train professionally or have gym training as your job then you will have to become Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde as I have.

I am a girl and I lift heavy! What is your excuse?

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