Tag Archives: snatch

Compete to better yourself vs train to be ready to compete

 

In the past few months, in between living my life, working and my weightlifting training I was also exposed to competitive weightlifting from both athlete’s perspective (competing myself) and from organisational aspect such as putting a team of athletes together to compete and hosting a competition in my home club (Battersea Weightlifting Club).snatch

This experience opened up a dialogue with fellow lifters and club’s athletes. What I’ve learnt as an athlete myself is that there are many good lifters, new lifters who don’t want to compete or represent the club for quiet a strange reason which I would refer to as misunderstanding, misconception or even missing the point.

There are many weightlifting competitions taking place throughout the year in the UK and while majority of competitions are only for registered athletes [under British Weightlifting Federation] they allowathletes of all abilities (new and professional) to compete in front of the referees on the platform and more than likely with very good and supportive audience.

I only took part in two competitions this year thus far under British Weighltifting and on behalf of my club; however competed in others such as lifting league for South-East of the UK.

First competition took place in January 2015 and it was a great experience. Out of 6 lifts I’ve hit 5 good lifts which was great and then I’ve missed two competitions due to travelling and competed again at the end of May.

Many of my fellow lifters ask me if I am ready to compete? My answer is simple: as ready as I can be!

So, why are there athletes, lifters, males and females who are scared of weightlifting and when invited to compete they decline with usual excuse: “I am not ready, I need to train more to be able to compete!”

My coach once told me that competing to get experience as a new lifter is what I should focus on. Get as many times on the platform as you can – was his view.

So I did! Once registered for the competition my competitive spirit then started to get concerned about making weight category (ie. dropping into category I would like to compete instead of just getting as many good lifts as possible). I was also getting too concerned about being the weakest lifter on the platform with very low opening attempts.

My fears were well-managed and consequently eliminated by my fellow lifter and training partner and coach. All of the worries about body weight and other lifters were irrelevant to me as a new lifter.

The moment I stepped on to the platform I hit new PBs; both in snatch and clean&jerk.

The difference between training and lifting at the competition was that I couldn’t hit those numbers in the training and struggled to get over my comfortable numbers. When I was encouraged to compete the work I’ve put into the preparation has paid off on the platform. For me it was the adrenalin, the coach, the audience and ambience which made a difference.

Why should you aim to compete and enter the competitive weightlifting at any stage?

1. Competitive weightlifting gives lifters different experience from ambience, warm up and build up to your first lift through to your best lift

2. Adrenalin levels often than not run much higher in the competitive environment over training environment which means that your PBs are likely to be hit and new PBs made

3. Learning from other lifters of similar weight, body composition which you might not normally see lifting with you or next to you in the warm up room will give you new perspective

4. Relationship with your coach changes and improves every time you prepare for competition, compete and even after competition. You will get to know your coach from different angle. You will see a different person and not just somebody who writes a programme and shouts clues at you during training.

5. Finally, entering competitive weightlifting gives those who train hard, have a strict routine a reason to celebrate and reflect on the progress made; I treat myself to a few days off from training and enjoy good food treats.

By believe that you are not good enough or ready enough to compete you are holding back from facing the referees, the platform and most importantly yourself from your true athletic and physical potential and new PBs.

Getting involved with competitive weightlifting is simple:

1. register with British Weightlifting by registering as unattached athlete or attached (by joining a club)

2. find out about your local competitions and clubs and maybe start with club competitions

3. ensure you have a good coach who understands weightlifting and supports you in competition

4. get involved!

I am a girl and I lift heavy

More references can be found here:

http://britishweightlifting.org/

https://www.facebook.com/batterseaweightlifting

 

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Fight against female weightlifting misconceptions and celebrating femininity with heavy loaded barbell

Sitting at an English Weightlifting Championship 2015 in Leeds as a spectator and keen supporter of Olympic weightlifting and every athlete who appeared on the podium regardless of his or her club or weight category, made me feel great
about being part of the sport’s community which recognises top level fitness, functional fitness and strength built and acquired through hard work, practice, training and disciplined life.

Not all athletes, perhaps hardly any, are sponsored these days, so preparation for the competition which is often the pinnacle of athlete’s efforts is all about discipline and juggling priorities with work, training and leisure time.

Turning up at the competition whether local, regional or national is often surrounded by injuries and unforeseen events. It is rarely the ideal or perfect time for athlete, but we all learn to work around it and adapt and continue challenging ourselves.

Females whom I watched competing across two days ranged in body weight, body type and performance. All of them had two things in common; the journey they took to get here as well as the celebration they received from the sport’s community, spectators, coaches and families.

These competitions aren’t hosted just to showcase individuals but to celebrate high athletic performance, dedication and disciplined and relentless life of athletes. Weightlifting is historically associated with strong men! Misconceptions cloud over female lifters and female weightlifting as a sport discipline in general is almost frowned upon by general public.

It’s no news to any female lifters whether competing here this weekend or training in their local gym that we are rarely encouraged or recognised for our hard training and work we put into athletic performance by the society; it’s highly likely that we are commented on in a dismissive almost uneducated manner that we will be fat, big and ugly if we lift heavy weights.

This weekend I sat in the audience and watched amazing girls who not only showcased female strength but also the femininity and beauty at it’s best. Lifting shoes replaced high heels and dust from chalking up hands was the make up for a day! Instead of having a pint of lager in our hands and talk crap we all chose to be here, pay respect to the barbell and our coaches and talk “snatch” and “clean & jerk” as well as PBs (personal bests) and strategies maybe even touch on training techniques which got us on the podium and helped us qualify.

Perhaps weightlifting doesn’t attract crowds of football or athletics but it celebrates athletes performance in the same way as any other Olympic sport.

All I experienced this weekend was very refreshing, big crowd of spectators supported all female competitors just by being here, clapping and cheering them on. All weight categories were much bigger in the number of female competitors than previously experienced which is good news for sport and fight against misconceptions associated with female weightlifting.

Anyone wanting to experience hard work at the gym paying off through respect you gain by competing and facing a room full of like minded crowd should at least join the crowd and watch local or regional competition and maybe join the club for some quality coaching and training.

It’s never too late to train and compete. Weightlifting is very inclusive sport and it recognises hard work of individuals really well.

I am a girl and I lift heavy

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“All in One” long term measuring of your weightlifting performance, body weight, clothes size and major lifts… conclusions which will shock most weightloss theories

Past few days I spent collating information and data jotted down in various diaries and notepads I had started and never finished since October 2012 and searching for email conversations with my coaches related to my progress and data.

Putting together a table and chart which covers a lot of (at times) random information was a big ask on myself, but I have finally finished it and my own findings and statements below are the result of a long-term (22 months) data and information recorded in a simple excel format.

The graph 1 which I produced from this data is somewhat less easy to read so I decided to break it down to main comparables in a series of graph for example “body weight” vs “clothes size” to prove that the myth of” weight loss diets mean smaller clothes” is just a myth!

What was I recording:

Body Weight / dress size / front squat / back squat / dead lift/ snatch (lift) / clean and jerk (lift) / injuries

main chart

A few conclusions from my initial graph are as follows:

* The most body weight (in kg) I’ve lost in the measured period of 22 months was staggering 17kg!!!

* My average body weight in those 22 months was 62.18 kg

* The longest injury free period was 4 months at the very beginning of the measured period where I weight 70kg and lifted a very small % of my body weight. Another 4 months of injury free period was early this year Feb – May 2014, the time I was hitting heavier weights and started crossfit (April 2014)

* I had over two months off from training due to my broken foot which is the injury incurred during Tough Mudder 2013

* My lifts started to improve this year significantly after joining crossfit box in London and I also dedicated a lot of time to weightlifting and became coached by Rich Kite

* My body weight is creeping up slightly, however my dress size dropped to UK 6 even though I am 5 kg heavier than my lightest 54kg when I was size UK8

 

Graph2: Body Weight vs Clothes size

When I was at my heaviest 71 kg my dress size was UK14. This was not due to my whole body being fat, but predominantly my body shape being “pear shape” which meant my hips were very wide and I carried a lot of fat on my hips, tummy and on my back.

After 18 months I was weighing 54kg but my dress size was UK8. Today I weigh 58-59kg and my dress size is UK6. Muscles weigh more than fat!

graph 1

Graph 3: Clean and Jerk and Front Squat have direct correlation

The below indicates a few key points for my training. Front squats are important in your clean and jerk olympic lift. There is a direct correlation between the weight squatted and the weight cleaned. No wonder that part of my weightlifting training session is front squat.

Muscle memory: You can see that I had no lifts recorded last summer (2013). It is because I was injured and couldn’t lift or train. Though muscle memory remained pretty strong and my return to lifting was pretty strong too. More on muscle memory can be read here: http://www.dna-sports-performance.com/coaches-zone/muscle-memory-a-coaches-perspective/

c&J and front squat

As I dig deeper into my analysis of my figures I will be publishing more articles on my form and performance over 22 months period.

I am a girl and I lift heavy x