Monthly Archives: February 2015

Fight against female weightlifting misconceptions and celebrating femininity with heavy loaded barbell

Sitting at an English Weightlifting Championship 2015 in Leeds as a spectator and keen supporter of Olympic weightlifting and every athlete who appeared on the podium regardless of his or her club or weight category, made me feel great
about being part of the sport’s community which recognises top level fitness, functional fitness and strength built and acquired through hard work, practice, training and disciplined life.

Not all athletes, perhaps hardly any, are sponsored these days, so preparation for the competition which is often the pinnacle of athlete’s efforts is all about discipline and juggling priorities with work, training and leisure time.

Turning up at the competition whether local, regional or national is often surrounded by injuries and unforeseen events. It is rarely the ideal or perfect time for athlete, but we all learn to work around it and adapt and continue challenging ourselves.

Females whom I watched competing across two days ranged in body weight, body type and performance. All of them had two things in common; the journey they took to get here as well as the celebration they received from the sport’s community, spectators, coaches and families.

These competitions aren’t hosted just to showcase individuals but to celebrate high athletic performance, dedication and disciplined and relentless life of athletes. Weightlifting is historically associated with strong men! Misconceptions cloud over female lifters and female weightlifting as a sport discipline in general is almost frowned upon by general public.

It’s no news to any female lifters whether competing here this weekend or training in their local gym that we are rarely encouraged or recognised for our hard training and work we put into athletic performance by the society; it’s highly likely that we are commented on in a dismissive almost uneducated manner that we will be fat, big and ugly if we lift heavy weights.

This weekend I sat in the audience and watched amazing girls who not only showcased female strength but also the femininity and beauty at it’s best. Lifting shoes replaced high heels and dust from chalking up hands was the make up for a day! Instead of having a pint of lager in our hands and talk crap we all chose to be here, pay respect to the barbell and our coaches and talk “snatch” and “clean & jerk” as well as PBs (personal bests) and strategies maybe even touch on training techniques which got us on the podium and helped us qualify.

Perhaps weightlifting doesn’t attract crowds of football or athletics but it celebrates athletes performance in the same way as any other Olympic sport.

All I experienced this weekend was very refreshing, big crowd of spectators supported all female competitors just by being here, clapping and cheering them on. All weight categories were much bigger in the number of female competitors than previously experienced which is good news for sport and fight against misconceptions associated with female weightlifting.

Anyone wanting to experience hard work at the gym paying off through respect you gain by competing and facing a room full of like minded crowd should at least join the crowd and watch local or regional competition and maybe join the club for some quality coaching and training.

It’s never too late to train and compete. Weightlifting is very inclusive sport and it recognises hard work of individuals really well.

I am a girl and I lift heavy

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