Monthly Archives: January 2015

Weightlifting competition – is it too early to compete or should you throw yourself at it?

Today was a long awaited day of my training and post injury recovery.
I attended my first weightlifting competition in Olympic lifting which includes two lifts: snatch and clean and jerk.

Over Christmas period I had no idea when I would be competing but expressed my desire to my coach; and given I just started to train post my wrist operation I wasn’t even ready for a competition (in my mind).

Early January I found out there is a competition for Novices (to weightlifting) and that this opportunity should be taken. After much deliberation with my coach; my lifting partner Thea and many other influencers in my life I got convinced into participation.

At a time my post festive body weight was around 62kgs and my training bests were 30kg on snatch and 40kg on c&j. This would be a reasonable start for a novice but I wanted to ensure that I am competing in a much lower body weight and with some stronger PBs to back me up.

So I had 3 weeks to drop a weight (at least 4kgs) and train for the competition. In those 3 weeks I spent 10 days working abroad which was a challenge as I had no access to my coach and had to ensure I eat healthy despite my social entertainment with clients.

3 weeks gone by and I dropped my weight into 57.4kg which was suitable for my weight category. It was not easy and it was done in a very short window which is not recommended to anyone without professional advice on the topic of weight loss for competition purposes.

I’ve experienced many practical challenges and emotional challenges. Here is what I learnt:

1. Planning your training in a short window – I am lucky to have a great coach who is supported by an experienced female lifter and them two structured my training. I trained a few sessions with them two listening to clues and advice and while away I trained as prescribed. I upped my training and loaded a few more kgs on my personal bests in that time. 35kg on snatch and 47.5kg on clean and jerk

Advice: listen to your coach and even if you miss your prescribed lifts in the training carry on to the next one. Do lots of squats and pulls. They will do you a huge favour in actual lifts.

2. Eating, nutrition and fast weight loss
This was my bible in the past two weeks. I ate healthily (chicken, salads and mainly keeping it clean) and kept my nutrients flowing into my body. Only last 3-4 days before the competition I followed a weight loss plan through reducing calories and increasing water intake and ending it with dehydration. It was very short dehydration and period when I abandoned my eating habits. It is not advisable to do this without experienced help. It is also not something I will repeat any time soon

Advice: don’t get frustrated because of your body weight. It only matters in the competition. Training body weight is usually higher and even if you weigh in higher into the competition than you hoped you can still compete. It’s about the experience!

3. Emotions and the day of your first competition
If you think that competing is something you might want to embrace then I strongly advise you to go for it! Don’t wait for your best time and or perfect performance! The experience of competing will open up a whole new world to you and will change your view to training and training patterns.

I lifted 30kg in snatch (5kg lower than my PB) by missing one lift at 34kg. I was very nervous. Shaking was what I found myself before getting onto the podium. It was however incredible atmosphere and experience alone.

As I got more accustomed to the audience, referees and environment I felt better and my clean and jerk performance was spot on at
36kg
40kg
And 44kg

Advice: compete as soon as you can, even if it is only to participate. Every competition is different and it can teach you awful lot about you.
Jump on the opportunity and don’t wait for your personal bests to be good enough to compete.

In short this was a brilliant day. I can’t praise my coaches enough on how vital their input was to me whole 3 weeks of preparing for the competition.

Discipline is key to success. My route to success is paved with challenges and fails but as long as you don’t stop and don’t turn but carry on and learn you will arrive at the next milestone!

Milestone for me was to compete and success was to do 5 out of 6 lifts successfully.

Keep up reaching your dreams and turn them into milestones – it works!!!

I am a girl and I lift heavy

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Work, travel, hotels, restaurant and training…how to manage through strong will and motivation

I for many years travel with my work. Majority of my time is spent entertaining clients which is predominately through wining and dining or other social events.

When I first got into fitness and light training I would go for a few weeks eating clean and training regularly but every overseas trip would mean eating in restaurants and inevitable drinking sessions with clients.

I would find myself coming from work trips back to routine and training feeling all upset that I failed continuing on my mission to “lose weight” by eating well and drinking and also not training.

For the first time on my overseas trip I found a simple way to maintain my training program, my eating habits and working duties.

My trip also coincides with my first competition in weightlifting. I am in Spain spending 2 weeks away from London and these are the crucial two weeks before the competition. I guess that’s why I was pushed to consider and find ways to balance everything required from me professionally and also personally (training for the competition).

So here are my few quick tips how to integrate training and nutrition when working overseas

1. Book a hotel or accommodation which has some gym, swimming pool or activity areas (tennis courts) – in today’s competitive market of hotels there shouldn’t be a problem to find a good value for money hotel with gym…. Don’t forget to pack a sports bra, trainers, swimming suit and some leggins

2. If you (as much as me) prefer to continue with training and require Olympic lifting bars and bumper plates which are not often a part of standard globo gym equipment then turn to crossfit box. I’ve done it and for as little as €10 a session I am maintaining my program. Added benefit is you meet new friendly faces and exchange a few “crossfit” talks as well.

3. If eating out in restaurants is a daily occurrence stick to healthy choices. I’ve been here for a week almost and ate out every evening. I opted in for grilled meat and salads but also fish and seafood. Just because it’s a treat doesn’t mean it can’t be healthy.

4. Drink lots of water and avoid alcohol. I have had many offers of wine over dinner but I maintained my water only approach. It only takes refusing wine or alcohol twice or three times. Next time you do it, it is more natural.

5. Plan your days… Even though you are overseas the routine is important. I book my meetings in specific times and even dinners are booked for a bit later allowing me a time for a quick evening workout/ cardio….

6. Have your coach and training partner available on chat as in the times you might feel like giving into the drinking with clients and colleagues or can’t be bothered to train he/she might just be having right few words to motivate you…

7. If all above fails… Revisit your motivation to succeed in your goals. There are no real reasons why you should fail if you want it bad enough.

Given that my first competition is quiet soon I had to face the situation I found myself in due to my job and career and organise myself.

Happy training and working!

I am a girl and I lift heavy

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